More cops on streets

In a bid to get police officers actively involved in fighting crime on the streets rather than spending time at the stations, provincial minister of community safety Alan Winde launched a week-long pilot project that saw provincial government employees volunteer as commissioners of oaths.

It is hoped that through the initiative, which came as a result of Winde’s push to get more police on active patrolling duty, police officers can focus on averting crime.

“In the Western Cape, we are 4500 police officers short. I have written to national police minister Bheki Cele numerous times to ask for more police. To date, he has ignored my requests, and the plight of our communities,” he said. “As a province, we do not have a mandate over the police, but we want to do something to help our residents who are living in fear. Our solution is to relieve police officers from their desks so that they can get back onto our streets. If our Western Cape Government staff can do the police’s desk work for them, they can go out and focus on catching criminals.”

Last week Tuesday 12 February, Winde certified documents from a Western Cape Government safety kiosk, situated outside the Cape Town Police Station.

SAPS passing out parade
He was assisted by graduate interns from the Chrysalis Academy, who are on a year-long paid work placement programme in the Department of Community Safety.

“Another important benefit of this initiative is that it saves residents from standing in long queues. I hate it when people are forced to take time away from work, sometimes unpaid leave, to stand in long queues. We need to be able to help our residents to get their documents certified quickly, so that they can get back to work, and their incomes aren’t affected,” said Winde.

A large number of documents for college and job applications were certified. It is believed that around 200 people can be assisted per hour. If the project is successful, it will be rolled out across the province in the near future.

A snap survey among employees in the Western Cape Department of Community Safety showed that many staff members were willing to do voluntary shifts outside of working hours, at their local police station, to help their community.

“I am extremely proud of our employees for living up to our value of being a caring organisation,” he said.

In a bid to get police officers actively involved in fighting crime on the streets rather than spending time at the stations, provincial minister of community safety Alan Winde launched a week-long pilot project that saw provincial government employees volunteer as commissioners of oaths.

It is hoped that through the initiative, which came as a result of Winde’s push to get more police on active patrolling duty, police officers can focus on averting crime.

“In the Western Cape, we are 4500 police officers short. I have written to national police minister Bheki Cele numerous times to ask for more police. To date, he has ignored my requests, and the plight of our communities,” he said. “As a province, we do not have a mandate over the police, but we want to do something to help our residents who are living in fear. Our solution is to relieve police officers from their desks so that they can get back onto our streets. If our Western Cape Government staff can do the police’s desk work for them, they can go out and focus on catching criminals.”

Last week Tuesday 12 February, Winde certified documents from a Western Cape Government safety kiosk, situated outside the Cape Town Police Station.

He was assisted by graduate interns from the Chrysalis Academy, who are on a year-long paid work placement programme in the Department of Community Safety.

“Another important benefit of this initiative is that it saves residents from standing in long queues. I hate it when people are forced to take time away from work, sometimes unpaid leave, to stand in long queues. We need to be able to help our residents to get their documents certified quickly, so that they can get back to work, and their incomes aren’t affected,” said Winde.

A large number of documents for college and job applications were certified. It is believed that around 200 people can be assisted per hour. If the project is successful, it will be rolled out across the province in the near future.

A snap survey among employees in the Western Cape Department of Community Safety showed that many staff members were willing to do voluntary shifts outside of working hours, at their local police station, to help their community.

“I am extremely proud of our employees for living up to our value of being a caring organisation,” he said.

In a bid to get police officers actively involved in fighting crime on the streets rather than spending time at the stations, provincial minister of community safety Alan Winde launched a week-long pilot project that saw provincial government employees volunteer as commissioners of oaths.

It is hoped that through the initiative, which came as a result of Winde’s push to get more police on active patrolling duty, police officers can focus on averting crime.

“In the Western Cape, we are 4500 police officers short. I have written to national police minister Bheki Cele numerous times to ask for more police. To date, he has ignored my requests, and the plight of our communities,” he said. “As a province, we do not have a mandate over the police, but we want to do something to help our residents who are living in fear. Our solution is to relieve police officers from their desks so that they can get back onto our streets. If our Western Cape Government staff can do the police’s desk work for them, they can go out and focus on catching criminals.”

Last week Tuesday 12 February, Winde certified documents from a Western Cape Government safety kiosk, situated outside the Cape Town Police Station.

He was assisted by graduate interns from the Chrysalis Academy, who are on a year-long paid work placement programme in the Department of Community Safety.

“Another important benefit of this initiative is that it saves residents from standing in long queues. I hate it when people are forced to take time away from work, sometimes unpaid leave, to stand in long queues. We need to be able to help our residents to get their documents certified quickly, so that they can get back to work, and their incomes aren’t affected,” said Winde.

A large number of documents for college and job applications were certified. It is believed that around 200 people can be assisted per hour. If the project is successful, it will be rolled out across the province in the near future.

A snap survey among employees in the Western Cape Department of Community Safety showed that many staff members were willing to do voluntary shifts outside of working hours, at their local police station, to help their community.

“I am extremely proud of our employees for living up to our value of being a caring organisation,” he said.

In a bid to get police officers actively involved in fighting crime on the streets rather than spending time at the stations, provincial minister of community safety Alan Winde launched a week-long pilot project that saw provincial government employees volunteer as commissioners of oaths. It is hoped that through the initiative, which came as a result of Winde’s push to get more police on active patrolling duty, police officers can focus on averting crime.

“In the Western Cape, we are 4500 police officers short. I have written to national police minister Bheki Cele numerous times to ask for more police. To date, he has ignored my requests, and the plight of our communities,” he said. “As a province, we do not have a mandate over the police, but we want to do something to help our residents who are living in fear. Our solution is to relieve police officers from their desks so that they can get back onto our streets. If our Western Cape Government staff can do the police’s desk work for them, they can go out and focus on catching criminals.”

Last week Tuesday 12 February, Winde certified documents from a Western Cape Government safety kiosk, situated outside the Cape Town Police Station.

He was assisted by graduate interns from the Chrysalis Academy, who are on a year-long paid work placement programme in the Department of Community Safety.

“Another important benefit of this initiative is that it saves residents from standing in long queues. I hate it when people are forced to take time away from work, sometimes unpaid leave, to stand in long queues. We need to be able to help our residents to get their documents certified quickly, so that they can get back to work, and their incomes aren’t affected,” said Winde.

A large number of documents for college and job applications were certified. It is believed that around 200 people can be assisted per hour. If the project is successful, it will be rolled out across the province in the near future. A snap survey among employees in the Western Cape Department of Community Safety showed that many staff members were willing to do voluntary shifts outside of working hours, at their local police station, to help their community. “I am extremely proud of our employees for living up to our value of being a caring organisation,” he said.

In a bid to get police officers actively involved in fighting crime on the streets rather than spending time at the stations, provincial minister of community safety Alan Winde launched a week-long pilot project that saw provincial government employees volunteer as commissioners of oaths.

It is hoped that through the initiative, which came as a result of Winde’s push to get more police on active patrolling duty, police officers can focus on averting crime.

“In the Western Cape, we are 4500 police officers short. I have written to national police minister Bheki Cele numerous times to ask for more police. To date, he has ignored my requests, and the plight of our communities,” he said. “As a province, we do not have a mandate over the police, but we want to do something to help our residents who are living in fear. Our solution is to relieve police officers from their desks so that they can get back onto our streets. If our Western Cape Government staff can do the police’s desk work for them, they can go out and focus on catching criminals.”

Last week Tuesday 12 February, Winde certified documents from a Western Cape Government safety kiosk, situated outside the Cape Town Police Station.

He was assisted by graduate interns from the Chrysalis Academy, who are on a year-long paid work placement programme in the Department of Community Safety.

“Another important benefit of this initiative is that it saves residents from standing in long queues. I hate it when people are forced to take time away from work, sometimes unpaid leave, to stand in long queues. We need to be able to help our residents to get their documents certified quickly, so that they can get back to work, and their incomes aren’t affected,” said Winde.

A large number of documents for college and job applications were certified. It is believed that around 200 people can be assisted per hour. If the project is successful, it will be rolled out across the province in the near future.

A snap survey among employees in the Western Cape Department of Community Safety showed that many staff members were willing to do voluntary shifts outside of working hours, at their local police station, to help their community.

“I am extremely proud of our employees for living up to our value of being a caring organisation,” he said.

In a bid to get police officers actively involved in fighting crime on the streets rather than spending time at the stations, provincial minister of community safety Alan Winde launched a week-long pilot project that saw provincial government employees volunteer as commissioners of oaths.

It is hoped that through the initiative, which came as a result of Winde’s push to get more police on active patrolling duty, police officers can focus on averting crime.

“In the Western Cape, we are 4500 police officers short. I have written to national police minister Bheki Cele numerous times to ask for more police. To date, he has ignored my requests, and the plight of our communities,” he said. “As a province, we do not have a mandate over the police, but we want to do something to help our residents who are living in fear. Our solution is to relieve police officers from their desks so that they can get back onto our streets. If our Western Cape Government staff can do the police’s desk work for them, they can go out and focus on catching criminals.”

Last week Tuesday 12 February, Winde certified documents from a Western Cape Government safety kiosk, situated outside the Cape Town Police Station.

He was assisted by graduate interns from the Chrysalis Academy, who are on a year-long paid work placement programme in the Department of Community Safety.

“Another important benefit of this initiative is that it saves residents from standing in long queues. I hate it when people are forced to take time away from work, sometimes unpaid leave, to stand in long queues. We need to be able to help our residents to get their documents certified quickly, so that they can get back to work, and their incomes aren’t affected,” said Winde.

A large number of documents for college and job applications were certified. It is believed that around 200 people can be assisted per hour. If the project is successful, it will be rolled out across the province in the near future.

A snap survey among employees in the Western Cape Department of Community Safety showed that many staff members were willing to do voluntary shifts outside of working hours, at their local police station, to help their community.

“I am extremely proud of our employees for living up to our value of being a caring organisation,” he said.

In a bid to get police officers actively involved in fighting crime on the streets rather than spending time at the stations, provincial minister of community safety Alan Winde launched a week-long pilot project that saw provincial government employees volunteer as commissioners of oaths.

It is hoped that through the initiative, which came as a result of Winde’s push to get more police on active patrolling duty, police officers can focus on averting crime.

“In the Western Cape, we are 4500 police officers short. I have written to national police minister Bheki Cele numerous times to ask for more police. To date, he has ignored my requests, and the plight of our communities,” he said. “As a province, we do not have a mandate over the police, but we want to do something to help our residents who are living in fear. Our solution is to relieve police officers from their desks so that they can get back onto our streets. If our Western Cape Government staff can do the police’s desk work for them, they can go out and focus on catching criminals.”

Last week Tuesday 12 February, Winde certified documents from a Western Cape Government safety kiosk, situated outside the Cape Town Police Station.

He was assisted by graduate interns from the Chrysalis Academy, who are on a year-long paid work placement programme in the Department of Community Safety.

“Another important benefit of this initiative is that it saves residents from standing in long queues. I hate it when people are forced to take time away from work, sometimes unpaid leave, to stand in long queues. We need to be able to help our residents to get their documents certified quickly, so that they can get back to work, and their incomes aren’t affected,” said Winde.

A large number of documents for college and job applications were certified. It is believed that around 200 people can be assisted per hour. If the project is successful, it will be rolled out across the province in the near future.

A snap survey among employees in the Western Cape Department of Community Safety showed that many staff members were willing to do voluntary shifts outside of working hours, at their local police station, to help their community.

“I am extremely proud of our employees for living up to our value of being a caring organisation,” he said.

In a bid to get police officers actively involved in fighting crime on the streets rather than spending time at the stations, provincial minister of community safety Alan Winde launched a week-long pilot project that saw provincial government employees volunteer as commissioners of oaths.

It is hoped that through the initiative, which came as a result of Winde’s push to get more police on active patrolling duty, police officers can focus on averting crime.

“In the Western Cape, we are 4500 police officers short. I have written to national police minister Bheki Cele numerous times to ask for more police. To date, he has ignored my requests, and the plight of our communities,” he said. “As a province, we do not have a mandate over the police, but we want to do something to help our residents who are living in fear. Our solution is to relieve police officers from their desks so that they can get back onto our streets. If our Western Cape Government staff can do the police’s desk work for them, they can go out and focus on catching criminals.”

Last week Tuesday 12 February, Winde certified documents from a Western Cape Government safety kiosk, situated outside the Cape Town Police Station.

He was assisted by graduate interns from the Chrysalis Academy, who are on a year-long paid work placement programme in the Department of Community Safety.

“Another important benefit of this initiative is that it saves residents from standing in long queues. I hate it when people are forced to take time away from work, sometimes unpaid leave, to stand in long queues. We need to be able to help our residents to get their documents certified quickly, so that they can get back to work, and their incomes aren’t affected,” said Winde.

A large number of documents for college and job applications were certified. It is believed that around 200 people can be assisted per hour. If the project is successful, it will be rolled out across the province in the near future.

A snap survey among employees in the Western Cape Department of Community Safety showed that many staff members were willing to do voluntary shifts outside of working hours, at their local police station, to help their community.

“I am extremely proud of our employees for living up to our value of being a caring organisation,” he said.

In a bid to get police officers actively involved in fighting crime on the streets rather than spending time at the stations, provincial minister of community safety Alan Winde launched a week-long pilot project that saw provincial government employees volunteer as commissioners of oaths.

It is hoped that through the initiative, which came as a result of Winde’s push to get more police on active patrolling duty, police officers can focus on averting crime.

“In the Western Cape, we are 4500 police officers short. I have written to national police minister Bheki Cele numerous times to ask for more police. To date, he has ignored my requests, and the plight of our communities,” he said. “As a province, we do not have a mandate over the police, but we want to do something to help our residents who are living in fear. Our solution is to relieve police officers from their desks so that they can get back onto our streets. If our Western Cape Government staff can do the police’s desk work for them, they can go out and focus on catching criminals.”

Last week Tuesday 12 February, Winde certified documents from a Western Cape Government safety kiosk, situated outside the Cape Town Police Station.

He was assisted by graduate interns from the Chrysalis Academy, who are on a year-long paid work placement programme in the Department of Community Safety.

“Another important benefit of this initiative is that it saves residents from standing in long queues. I hate it when people are forced to take time away from work, sometimes unpaid leave, to stand in long queues. We need to be able to help our residents to get their documents certified quickly, so that they can get back to work, and their incomes aren’t affected,” said Winde.

A large number of documents for college and job applications were certified. It is believed that around 200 people can be assisted per hour. If the project is successful, it will be rolled out across the province in the near future.

A snap survey among employees in the Western Cape Department of Community Safety showed that many staff members were willing to do voluntary shifts outside of working hours, at their local police station, to help their community.

“I am extremely proud of our employees for living up to our value of being a caring organisation,” he said.

In a bid to get police officers actively involved in fighting crime on the streets rather than spending time at the stations, provincial minister of community safety Alan Winde launched a week-long pilot project that saw provincial government employees volunteer as commissioners of oaths.

It is hoped that through the initiative, which came as a result of Winde’s push to get more police on active patrolling duty, police officers can focus on averting crime.

“In the Western Cape, we are 4500 police officers short. I have written to national police minister Bheki Cele numerous times to ask for more police. To date, he has ignored my requests, and the plight of our communities,” he said. “As a province, we do not have a mandate over the police, but we want to do something to help our residents who are living in fear. Our solution is to relieve police officers from their desks so that they can get back onto our streets. If our Western Cape Government staff can do the police’s desk work for them, they can go out and focus on catching criminals.”

Last week Tuesday 12 February, Winde certified documents from a Western Cape Government safety kiosk, situated outside the Cape Town Police Station.

He was assisted by graduate interns from the Chrysalis Academy, who are on a year-long paid work placement programme in the Department of Community Safety.

“Another important benefit of this initiative is that it saves residents from standing in long queues. I hate it when people are forced to take time away from work, sometimes unpaid leave, to stand in long queues. We need to be able to help our residents to get their documents certified quickly, so that they can get back to work, and their incomes aren’t affected,” said Winde.

A large number of documents for college and job applications were certified. It is believed that around 200 people can be assisted per hour. If the project is successful, it will be rolled out across the province in the near future.

A snap survey among employees in the Western Cape Department of Community Safety showed that many staff members were willing to do voluntary shifts outside of working hours, at their local police station, to help their community.

“I am extremely proud of our employees for living up to our value of being a caring organisation,” he said.

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